Guest post: Underrated Activities That Promote Whole Health

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Underrated Activities That Promote Whole Health

By Brad Krause

Eat breakfast, don’t drink too much, smile and be happy — these are pretty basic aspects of a healthy lifestyle. But if this is all you are doing, you are seriously missing out. There are many ways to cater to your self-care needs. From the ancient practice of bath therapy to modern-day motivators, the following are a few of the most under-appreciated ways to live your best life.

 

Take a Warm Bath

The ancient Romans provided public bathhouses, and it wasn’t to ensure proper hygiene. Bathhouses were considered meeting places, but they also provided heat, warmth, and relaxation. Traditional Medicinals explains that bath therapy, also known as balneotherapy, is used to relax muscles and promote skin health. A warm bath in the afternoon is a great way to center your thoughts and settle in for another important aspect of self-care: sleep.

 

Go to Bed Early

Sleep is good for you for many reasons. It allows your body to recover from daily trauma and gives your mind an outlet to process the billions of bits of information that were thrown at you during the day. Make a conscious effort to get eight hours of sleep every night, and you will quickly realize that you have more energy, less stress, and feel better overall.

 

Exercise

 

It’s no secret that physical activity is crucial for your health. However, it is important to note that you don’t have to conform to a specific exercise program to reap the benefits. You also do not have to be 25 and in the best shape of your life to work out. In fact, seniors benefit just as much — and probably more so — than their recent-college-grad counterparts. No matter your age, you can get regular exercise by attending workout classes at a local facility, setting up a workout space at home, or simply doing things that would make you more active during the day like going for a walk or taking the stairs to work.

 

Track Your Activities

Exercising occasionally is not enough. One of the biggest benefits of working out is that it can help reduce the effects of stress. Keep yourself motivated to move by tracking your daily activities. For example, the Apple Watch Series 4 is great for seniors since it includes a built-in heart rate monitor. Of course, if you don’t want to spend several hundred dollars on a fitness tracker, Digital Trends lists several models that are less than $100, including the Withings Move, which looks more like a tradition analog timepiece.

 

Try Acupuncture

Acupuncture is not a new-age treatment. This ancient practice predates modern medicine by hundreds of years. A non-invasive healing treatment, acupuncture — especially when combined with Chinese medicine and herbs — can help you with issues such as constipation and bronchitis. Acupuncture also offers emotional relief for insomnia, stress, and depression. Visit a local acupuncturist for your personalized therapy.

 

Eat for Gut Health

You may be surprised to know that your gut plays a vital role in your overall health, from weight management to your mood levels. That’s because the gut contains many different strains of bacteria, each responsible for specific bodily functions. For example, Bifidobacterium helps to keep your intestines healthy and produces essential vitamins like B12. Meanwhile, L. helveticus and B. longum both act as mood boosters. Keeping a well-balanced environment in your gut will help these bacteria thrive and improve your health. The key is to eat the right foods for your gut and take supplements that promote gut health.

 

Drink More Water

How much water do you drink every day? If you’re like most people, probably nowhere near enough. This is unfortunate because adding a few extra glasses of H2O to your day flushes your kidneys, normalizes bowel function, and can even reduce the risk of cancer. You can add fresh fruit to your glass for a refreshing drink that’s full of flavor if you don’t like plain water.

 

Everything you do has an effect on your health. From sneaking a 30-minute warm bath to lying down on the acupuncture table, the above ideas are simple, inexpensive, and effective ways to give yourself a boost from the inside out. Try a few or try them all. You won’t regret your decision, and you’ll feel much better for it.

 

Image via Pexels

First salad of 2019 harvested & recipe

Picked our first spinach, rocket and crinkled cress yesterday.

Yummy and fresh.

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Now they may look like they are on top of a pile of goo – and it is a pile of goo – but it is very good goo which is meant to look prettier but I cooked it for too long. It is meant to look like this:

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(From Banyan Botanicals Website — thank you)

It is kitchari – a traditional Ayurvedic recipe which is meant to be gentle and nourishing for the digestive system. Kitchari, which literally means mixture, is a blend of rice and usually spilt lentils with spices and an assortment of vegetables of choice. A one-pot dish, kitchari originates from Asia and has references dating back thousands of years. The use of spices and vegetables can produce balancing effects for the three bodily dosas in Ayurvedic medicine. Rice and mung dal together create a balanced food that is a good protein combination and is tridoshic. This complete food is easy to digest and gives strength and vitality and nourishes all the tissues of the body.

There are many different recipes with variations and this is just one recipe that I have tried from Banyan Botanicals. It is surprisingly quick and easy to prepare. It can be frozen if needed but best eaten fresh.

Kitchari 

(Serves 4)

  • 1/2cup yellow mung dal
  • 1 cup rice
  • 2tbsp ghee/ coconut oil
  • 1tsp black mustard seeds
  • 1tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 small pinch of asafoetida (hing) powder
  • 1tsp turmeric powder
  • 1tsp coriander powder
  • 4 thin slices fresh root ginger
  • 6 cups of water
  • 1-2 cups of vegetables (e.g. sweet potato, courgettes (zucchini), squash, celery, carrot, beetroot etc.) cut into small bite-sized pieces
  • Fresh herbs to top, optional
  1. Soak the dal overnight in water. Drain.
  2. In a non-stick pan, warm the ghee/coconut oil. Add all of the spices an sauté for a minute or two. Add the rice and dal and sauté like a pilau for a couple more minutes. Add 6 cups of water and bring to the boil.
  3. Cover and allow to simmer for about 30 minutes until the rice and dal is cooked.
  4. Add the vegetables half way through the cooking process, stir and allow to slowly cook for the remaining time.
  5. Add more water if needed. From Banyan Botanicals: Typically, kitchari is the consistency of a vegetable stew as opposed to a broth. A thinner consistency is preferable if your digestion is weak. You will notice that kitchari will thicken when it cools and you may need more water than you originally thought.

A good vegetable stew that can us homegrown produce. Enjoy!

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https://www.banyanbotanicals.com/info/ayurvedic-living/living-ayurveda/diet/how-to-make-kitchari/

https://www.ayurveda.com/recipes/kitchari

 

The pumpkins are coming…

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The pumpkins are turning orange – it must be autumn.

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We had a pretty good growth of pumpkins this year – at least one per plant. We’ve got about six in total off the top of my head.

I planted ‘Racer’ seeds indoors in tall yoghurt pots in April, I think… could have been May…

Anyway, they were planted outdoors into a very sunny patch during the heatwave. With regular feeds of rotted manure and blood fish and bone, they have flourished.

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We were really lucky that the heatwave kept back the powdery mildew this year (look at Powdery Mildew for more information and preventative treatment tips). This disease flourishes in warm but moist climates – so thank  you drought. It meant that the mildew that could attack as early as May or June stayed off until the last few days of August. Powdery mildew looks like this:

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To begin with, little spots of white mould form on the leaves. These quickly spread, covering the whole leaf and spreading to the stalks. The plant starts to turn brown. It shrivels and dies, sometimes taking the fruit with it. Very quickly you can end up with this:

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A dead plant.

I cut off two pumpkins yesterday from their dead plants to prevent the disease from spreading to the fruits themselves. Thank goodness they had already turned orange…

Next step is curing them…

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Parsley for acne

I had no idea until recently researching for a cooking book before trying it myself that parsley was good for getting rid of unwanted acne.

Parsley has been used for medicinal treatment for centuries, but has become just a herb we scatter on a dish to make it look fancy. We often reach for a shop bought bottle to wash or cure when we should really take a leaf out of our ancestors’ book and try simple homemade remedies.

Parsley contains a nice amount of antioxidants, which can help reduce the amount of free radicals (substances which may cause skin damage) in your body. Parsley contains beta carotene, which the body converts to Vitamin A, essential for speeding up the healing process of wounds and wrinkles. It provides antibacterial and anti fungal protection, especially when made into an essential oil. This herb is very rich in vitamin C, apparently great for brightening the skin and reducing blemishes. Vitamin C stimulates the production of collagen, which is the substance that keeps skin looking young and vital.

I was very pleased to find this evidence as we grow parsley in the veg garden. It gives the older, perhaps damaged or nibbled leaves that we do not necessarily want to choose to eat, a use.

This is my currant face wash at the moment which I would like to share. I mix the parsley with honey and apple cider vinegar, both well known ingredients for giving a kick-start to our health in a natural way.

If the apple cider vinegar is too strong for your skin, dilute it with 2tbsp water.

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Parsley Face Wash

-1 handful of parsley leaves -1tsp honey -2tbsp Apple Cider Vinegar

  1. Tear the parsley into small pieces in a bowl.
  2. Scrape a teaspoon of honey into the bowl before pouring in the apple cider vinegar. Mix well.
  3. Using a make up wipe or cotton wool pad, smear the concoction all over your face, rubbing in well and trying to encourage the parsley leaves to stick to your flesh. Continue to rub in, paying particular attention to any spots, until all of the mixture has been used up.
  4. Leave on your face for 5-10 minutes and then wash with warm water and apply a gentle moisturiser on afterwards. Repeat every three days for best results.

*If the mixture starts to irritate (sting, burn) your skin, rinse immediately.