The last of the Kale

I am currently picking the last ‘burst’ of small kale leaves from the curly kale I sowed last summer as they flower.

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Kale has had a lot of publicity over the last few years as a member of the dreaded team ‘superfood’. I’m a little snobbish of the phrase ‘superfood’ as it is basically ‘trendy food’ or ‘fad food’, ‘faze food’. It is the in-group in the culinary world, when leggings and purple hair are the height of fashion before jeans and original colours return, a superfood, like coconut which I think is the latest addition to the group, joins the Mean Girl cliche before being cast aside for the next fad that everyone has to join in with – to be cool. Since when did food need to be cool? I suppose it was always the case. Nevertheless, kale needs to be adored for it’s usefulness for the vegetable grower instead of the publicity it gets in the press. I was surprised when I ate it as I was expecting it to, honestly, be vile. It certainly does not look pretty on its own but it tastes, well, great.

Kale is high in iron, beta-carotene and folic acid. It is a source of vitamins A, C (more than in carrots, apparently) and K, manganese and copper. 80g contains 120mg of calcium, great for dairy-free dieters over the world. It is rich in lutein, an anti-oxidant that keeps our eyes healthy, 76mg lutein per kg while broccoli only contains 17mg. So far, so good.

It is thought to have descended from the ‘wild cabbage’, like broccoli, cauliflowers and other brassicas that came to Europe around 600BC by Celtic wanderers, being cultivated for over 2,000 years. Apparently it was a significant crop during the Roman times (but they are famous for not being very fussy eaters) and it was a crop for peasants in the Middle Ages until the popular cabbage found its way to our hearts. Kale is known for being grown in colder climates because of its resistance to frost – our garden was hit by severe frost earlier in January reaching a -3C  but I did not need to fleece them once, and they are still alive and pickable. It was so hardy, in the old days kitchens in Scotland used to have a special kale pot to cook the leafy green. Towards the end of the 20th century, kale was grown specifically as winter feed for livestock, such as sheep and cattle, on farms and consumed more by animals than humans. Now though, it has risen in our esteem more than ever as a nutritious vegetable and a valuable crop for the ‘hunger gap’ for home growers.

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Kale ‘Nero De Toscana’

Kale is a wonderful vegetable for the kitchen gardener. It is tough and prolific. Start sowing under cover or indoors from March, the last sowing being in October, and you will have enough kale to harvest over winter and then the following spring. They are a brassica so remember that they do need a lot of feeding and it is a good idea to net them in the dreaded cabbage white season as the caterpillars go nuts for them. I found that out last year but do not despair and rip the plants up, squash the caterpillars and leave the plants that will heal themselves and grow a new, fresh batch of leaves if given a little time. All of my ravaged kale grew lots of new leaves over the months. My favourite types are the green ‘Dwarf Curly Kale – Starbor’ and ‘Nero de Toscana’ kale with smoother leaves (more of a favourite with pests I have noticed and flowers quicker than curly kale). Another popular variety is ‘Red Russian kale’, a deep purple colour which tastes the exact same, think of it being like the purple version of green lettuce.

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Newly transplanted kale earlier this year in bottles for protection from wind and change in temperature
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Curly Kale baby

Over the last winter, kale was the one vegetable I could always rely on to pick in the ‘hungry gap’ when nothing else was growing. When my beloved spinach had ended or was too small to pick, when the last batch of frozen beans had gone and we had run out of peas and were on strike and refusing to go shopping, kale was the answer to our need for cooked greens. We harvest the leaves by picking them from the plant – one is supposed to pick the tallest ones further up the plants – before washing and stripping them off their slightly tough stalks and dumping them in boiling hot water to simmer for a few minutes until cooked. It is surprisingly yummy just plain boiled (I am not a fan for eating it raw but if you like it then that is brilliant as it is another way of enjoying this green). As well as eating it just boiled alongside the main dish, we also put the leaves in casseroles, Bolognese, lasagna, curries, stir fries etc. My brother doesn’t like kale on its own but is fine when it is mixed in a gloop as you can’t tell it is in there. I have tried making kale pesto – awful, I think only my mum and perhaps my sister liked it and I am sure they were just being polite, there are still two jars hidden at the back of the fridge. We also invented a kale version of Crispy Seaweed that you can get in Chinese restaurants or take aways and it is a very good version which I will share with you one day as well as a Kale Rice Bake which is delicious. However, today I thought it was a good idea to share with you one of the best dishes known to mankind where you can slip some kale in subtly: homemade pizza.

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Cooked homemade pizza

Making your own pizza is way better than ordering Dominos and it really is not that hard. In the winter add kale to the sauce, in the summer you could very between swiss chard or spinach or even some oriental komatsuna or pak choi. Feel free to add cut up ham, pineapple, pepperoni, olives or even some sweet peppers on top. We sometimes do half a pizza with these extra toppings and leave the other half just plain cheese for fussy me. The brilliant thin about making your own pizza is that you can play and add whatever you like. By the way, for those of you that have not heard of Italian passata, it is basically thickened tinned tomatoes, a sort of tomato puree but I would recommend splashing out on the passata rather than a puree from the bottle, it will taste far better. You can buy them in any normal supermarket or of course, try making some yourself if you get a glut of tomatoes in the summer?

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Pizza being assembled: the kale tomato paste is spread on top, followed by the cheese – the dark green in the topping is the sautéed kale
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Pizza just before cooking

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Unfortunately, for the most recent pizzas I have made lately,  I was out of mozzarella which I love on top of a pizza – it makes it so gooey and cheesy and I would recommend trying it. I often use a mixture of any cheese in the house, always chedder, mozzarella if I available, parmesan if any is grated already… This time I used a lot of cheddar cheese and some gruye, a cheese made from raw milk as well as some shavings of left-over parmesan from a previous meal. There are plenty of cheeses in the world, plenty of greens to try on top so get going and experiment.

I have included two versions: one uses a bread machine (the cheats way I use to ensure I get a good dough) but I have also added a hands-on method to try. Many chefs will advise you to use Italian 00 pasta flour or strong white bread flour. I use a majority of one of these, depending on what I have available, and I add about 10% of Khoresan flour, an old-fashioned flour you can buy from Doves in large supermarkets or online now (it is really good to use in homemade naan or pitta breads) and I add a little wholemeal bread flour into the mixture too. If you are a little daunted by the idea of mixing flours, then just stick to the safe strong white bread flour, it is more likely to rise, especially is using the hands-on method.

Enjoy!

Recipe:

Cheese and Kale Topped Pizza

(Serves 6, two or three slices per person)

Base: – 250g bread flour: I use mostly white flour, either ‘Strong White Bread Flour’, ’00 Pasta Flour’ with about 30g Khoresan flour with perhaps 50g-100g ‘Strong Wholemeal Bread Flour’. It is up to you, I would just advise using more white flour than any other to make sure the dough rises.

–  1 tsp (5g) fast-action dried yeast – 1tsp (5g) salt – 20 ml (2tbsp) olive oil – 160ml water

Topping: – 1 large onion, finely sliced – Olive oil, to fry in – 1-2 large garlic cloves – 500g packet of Italian Passata – About 200g kale, washed and de-stalked – A small handful of oregano leaves (I use anywhere from 8 – 14 small leaves), torn into fine pieces – A dash of maple syrup – Salt and pepper – 500g cheese of choice: I would advise about 300g cheddar cheese, one packet of mozzarella and the rest another cheese, like parmesan or gruye. Again, this is up to you – Any other additional toppings of your choice: e.g. ham and pineapple, olives, pepperoni etc.

  1. If you have a breadmaker, use this process for quickness and ease: Put the tsp of yeast into the bread pan followed by the flour, salt, olive oil and water. Put the bread pan inside the breadmaker and set it to your DOUGH setting, the timer should say 45 minutes. It is going to knead the ingredients together and help it rise.
  2. If you do not have a breadmaker: Put the yeast inside a large bowl followed by the flour and salt. Stir in the ingredients. Start to pour in the water, slowly as you mix to incorporate into a sticky dough, adding in the olive oil too. Once the mixture is completely combined, tip the dough out onto a floured surface and knead into a large ball so that it is not so sticky and more springy to the touch. Put inside a bowl or basket with a tea-towel and a plastic bag cover it and put it in a warm place, an airing cupboard is best, and leave to rise for about an hour.
  3. Meanwhile, pre-heat the oven to the highest temperature your oven can offer you, mine reaches 325C.
  4. Make the topping: in a large frying pan, fry the onion in the olive oil over a a medium flame until starting to brown. Add the passata and the diced garlic, turning the flame up to high and stirring – the aim is to boil off some of the passata liquid so it looks more like a thick gloop, not a runny paste that will slide off the pizza base in the cooking process. Add the kale and leave the mixture to boil for a couple of minutes, still stirring it occasionally. Add the torn oregano, a good dash of maple syrup and a grind of salt and then pepper. Stir in and leave to continue boiling off. Turn it down to simmer and grate the cheeses (cutting the mozzarella into thick pieces instead).
  5. Place a large silicone sheet on the floor, or baking paper, and dust with semolina. Dust the dough with semolina to prevent it from sticking to your hands and dump it on the sheet. Now, I cheat here for ease. I coat a rolling-pin in semolina and use to flatten out the dough, rolling it into a huge pizza shape to that it covers nearly all of the sheet (homemade pizzas are rarely a perfect circle, I call them ‘rustic’). Once it is large and flat, remove the topping from the low flame and scrape onto the pizza base. I like to use a spatula to do this. Spread the topping evenly all over the base.
  6. Put a layer of mozzarella cheese all over the base and then sprinkle the rest of the cheeses on top thickly. Add any other toppings now.
  7. Pull out a shelf in the oven and carefully lift and slide the large pizza onto it, be careful not to burn yourself. Cook in the oven for 10 minutes, keeping an eye on it towards the end to make sure it does not burn. Carefully remove from the oven and slide the sheet with the pizza still on top onto a large tray to carry. Cut using a large pair of scissors into slices and serve with a lovely salad picked straight from the garden. When we have a glut of runner-beans or peas, we serve these alongside it instead and it is as equally delicious. Any left-overs can be kept in a container in the fridge and eaten cold the next day or put inside a preheated oven to warm up.
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Serve with a fresh salad picked from the veg patch

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Swedes and Turnips – Hello May!

Finally, the frost has gone, the sun is shining and the world is hot. Boiling, in fact. The horticultural fleeces have been ripped from the trees and are now being used as shade for the vegetables I am planting out from indoors – a word on the wonders of fleece later.

I have been starting off pretty much all my seeds indoors this year. It was even too cold for the turnips to germinate outdoors and I did not dare sow my cosmos or lupin flower seeds outdoors in March with that strange weather happening. I think the only seeds I put straight in the ground that actually did really well this year were some spinach and radishes – they are huge, I just harvested some of the first the other day. Some Pak Choi, Tatsoi, spring onions and beetroot managed to germinate outdoors but not quite enough so I have tried planting some of all of these indoors for the first time. I just planted out the beetroot the other day and they are looking really good. I would recommend anyone to try sowing indoors, popping the plants daily on a sunny windowsill during daylight hours when they start to bud through the surface of the compost before planting them out when they are large enough to handle and the weather is forgiving.

However, now that the sun is shining I have a little more faith in sowing direct. On Thursday I took the risk of sowing some swede and more turnip seeds into the ground. Last year I was pleasantly surprised by how well the swedes germinated, and then tasted! I had never had a swede before and was pleased by how nice it was. We have tried it cup up and boiled along with carrots before mashing the two together with butter and serving alongside sausages (and Glamorgan sausages, in my case). We also have had them just boiled, like one would serve along with boiled peas, carrots, runner-beans, potatoes, so forth, at a roast dinner or again with sausages or chicken. They look like an odd vegetable but are quite hardy. I left mine in the ground, with no fleece all winter and they survived really well, only minor slug damage and still edible. The last couple that I have left in that were not worth harvesting due to their feeble size are currently going to flower and will either be a treat for my kune kune pigs or our friend’s collection of Jersey cows. I will put it out there right now, I love cows.

Anyway, back to sowing swedes: I planted the same type as last year, ‘Helenor’ that I bought from trusty Sainsbury’s (that we often manage to avoid for more than a month at a time as we are really not keen shoppers, hence the daydreaming of self-sufficiency and the good life seem so appealing). I planted them in well-rotted cow manure (courtesy of the Jersey cows), mixed in with earth and a good layer of mulch over the top to hold the water and nutrients in – I live on sandy soil so the goodness and water just runs away from the plants so feeding the soil is a constant priority to build it up. One sows seeds about half an inch deep, a hand apart is good enough. It is the same for the turnips. Now, I have never tried a turnip before and most people say it is gross, including my dad, but growing turnips is such a sweet old-fashioned thing and I am a sucker for the romantic old days, I just had to try it. Plus, Baldrick from ‘Blackadder’ loves turnips. I am trying ‘Purple Top Milan’, we shall see how they go. If they are really gross and I can’t shift them onto some poor neighbour then at least the pigs won’t be too fussy. You would be amazed how quickly they clean up their food at dinner time.

We shall see how the swedes and turnips grow. Until then, my next post will be coming very shortly, with a recipe intact…

Welcome!

Welcome to my kitchen gardening blog. I will be uploading hopefully posts that you will find interesting and useful about the growing your own in the garden and its culinary uses in the kitchen as well as documenting the weekly work done on our veg plot.

Some useful information about the vegetable garden: It is in the South-East of England (so weather reports will be based on this location). It is on sandy soil, about 1/2 acre big, definitely less than 1 acre but I do keep extending it (I like digging…). The current workers in our garden are myself and my mum who is as overly-excited about gardening and growing our own as me but less enthusiastic about cooking the stuff which is where I actually have some use. I will be sharing some recipes from the hectic kitchen with you all.

I started work on the overgrown veg patch about two years ago and now work in it every day, rain, sun or even snow because I love it so much.

We had a successful crop of produce last year, lets see what happens in 2016.