Guest post: Underrated Activities That Promote Whole Health

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Underrated Activities That Promote Whole Health

By Brad Krause

Eat breakfast, don’t drink too much, smile and be happy — these are pretty basic aspects of a healthy lifestyle. But if this is all you are doing, you are seriously missing out. There are many ways to cater to your self-care needs. From the ancient practice of bath therapy to modern-day motivators, the following are a few of the most under-appreciated ways to live your best life.

 

Take a Warm Bath

The ancient Romans provided public bathhouses, and it wasn’t to ensure proper hygiene. Bathhouses were considered meeting places, but they also provided heat, warmth, and relaxation. Traditional Medicinals explains that bath therapy, also known as balneotherapy, is used to relax muscles and promote skin health. A warm bath in the afternoon is a great way to center your thoughts and settle in for another important aspect of self-care: sleep.

 

Go to Bed Early

Sleep is good for you for many reasons. It allows your body to recover from daily trauma and gives your mind an outlet to process the billions of bits of information that were thrown at you during the day. Make a conscious effort to get eight hours of sleep every night, and you will quickly realize that you have more energy, less stress, and feel better overall.

 

Exercise

 

It’s no secret that physical activity is crucial for your health. However, it is important to note that you don’t have to conform to a specific exercise program to reap the benefits. You also do not have to be 25 and in the best shape of your life to work out. In fact, seniors benefit just as much — and probably more so — than their recent-college-grad counterparts. No matter your age, you can get regular exercise by attending workout classes at a local facility, setting up a workout space at home, or simply doing things that would make you more active during the day like going for a walk or taking the stairs to work.

 

Track Your Activities

Exercising occasionally is not enough. One of the biggest benefits of working out is that it can help reduce the effects of stress. Keep yourself motivated to move by tracking your daily activities. For example, the Apple Watch Series 4 is great for seniors since it includes a built-in heart rate monitor. Of course, if you don’t want to spend several hundred dollars on a fitness tracker, Digital Trends lists several models that are less than $100, including the Withings Move, which looks more like a tradition analog timepiece.

 

Try Acupuncture

Acupuncture is not a new-age treatment. This ancient practice predates modern medicine by hundreds of years. A non-invasive healing treatment, acupuncture — especially when combined with Chinese medicine and herbs — can help you with issues such as constipation and bronchitis. Acupuncture also offers emotional relief for insomnia, stress, and depression. Visit a local acupuncturist for your personalized therapy.

 

Eat for Gut Health

You may be surprised to know that your gut plays a vital role in your overall health, from weight management to your mood levels. That’s because the gut contains many different strains of bacteria, each responsible for specific bodily functions. For example, Bifidobacterium helps to keep your intestines healthy and produces essential vitamins like B12. Meanwhile, L. helveticus and B. longum both act as mood boosters. Keeping a well-balanced environment in your gut will help these bacteria thrive and improve your health. The key is to eat the right foods for your gut and take supplements that promote gut health.

 

Drink More Water

How much water do you drink every day? If you’re like most people, probably nowhere near enough. This is unfortunate because adding a few extra glasses of H2O to your day flushes your kidneys, normalizes bowel function, and can even reduce the risk of cancer. You can add fresh fruit to your glass for a refreshing drink that’s full of flavor if you don’t like plain water.

 

Everything you do has an effect on your health. From sneaking a 30-minute warm bath to lying down on the acupuncture table, the above ideas are simple, inexpensive, and effective ways to give yourself a boost from the inside out. Try a few or try them all. You won’t regret your decision, and you’ll feel much better for it.

 

Image via Pexels

Summery of 2018 in the Veg Garden

It is time to do the annual check list of how this year when in the vegetable garden.

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It was an unusually cold, uneventful spring this year – we basically skipped it and went straight from winter to summer. But boy, what a summer it was! Major heatwave and no rain for weeks on end. It was glorious, even if it did mean a lot of watering all day long…

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But how did this all impact on the plants?

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Lettuce – started off really good but struggled with the hot weather in the heatwave and bolted. We bought loose leaf lettuce plants from Sainsbury’s and planted them out and they did pretty well despite the weather. When they bolted, the ducks and chickens loved them.

Spinach – bad year for spinach, not a lot germinating, probably because my seeds were too old. I bought some new ones at the end of the season and got a few to grow, but it was too late by then. Oh well, next year!

Rocket – very good rocket growth this year. Planted some at the beginning of the season and at the end and both batches lasted ages – the last batch has only just gone thanks to Jack Frost.

Radishes – they love sun and were whopping sizes.

Carrots – started off very badly. I sowed them in early March and they did not germinate at all. Sowed some in June/July, thinking it wouldn’t work, and we got a beautiful crop. Some really big ones too!

Celery – I wasn’t going to grow celery this year but a neighbour gave us some spare plug-plants so I used them. They grew pretty well, but were not very tasty. I think they needed more watering a care.

Celeriac – again, wasn’t planning on growing more, but were given plug plants. They seem to be surviving, along with last years crop I never got out of the ground… at least the pigs will be happy…

Cauliflower – didn’t come to anything, as usual!

Peas – had some really good crops but the pea plants themselves died off really quickly. I think it was too dry and they needed more care and watering. Mixed bag with the germination rates.

Beetroot – did fantastically well. I only planted one batch and we still have three buried in the ground to get through. Bolthardy is amazing.

Cabbages – I was too late to sow brassicas so we bought some plug plants from the garden centre. The savoys and spring cabbages did not do very well and ended up going to the poultry, but the red cabbages… I am now converted. Beautiful, huge, delicious and a few more left to get through…

Brussel Sprouts – ran out of time to sow seeds but were given plug plants. They are huge and delicious. Producing really well despite my lack of feeding and weeding this year.

Sweetcorn -OMG. Best sweetcorn harvest ever. So big, yellow and yum. Really big cobs! So exciting.

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Pumpkins – amazing crop, some big and small ones, each plant produced lots.

Courgettes – really good. Mixture of types of courgettes grown this year, including Defender, Golden Zucchini, Grisdella etc. All produced lots, really yummy. Cucurbits do love sun.

Cucumbers – didn’t do great, but did fine. Needed more watering and care. Only got a few Passandras and Femspot varieties, I think.

Tomatoes: did pretty well, but again needed more care. Got a few outdoors and indoors this year thanks to the sunshine.

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Broccoli – ran out of time to sow so bought plug plants. Did pretty well – lots of small florets rather than big ones. Probably more water needed?

Aubergines – plug plant bought as my seeds did not germinate. I think harvested one? A few grew but did not develop into edible stage.

Sweet Pepper – plug plant as seeds did not germinate. Got quite a few small but delicious ones.

Runner-beans – very good harvest. So many grew after my fears none would germinate due to the hot weather. Roots left in ground from previous years grew again. Got an amazing supply and was still harvesting in November!

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Chickpeas – only one plant survived out of the billions of seeds planted. Didn’t develop anything. Will have to try again another year.

Onions – did not do great. Not very big. Needed more water probably.

Garlic – as good as always!

Potatoes – amazing as always! Bought some early Charlottes and Red Duke of York and a main crop Kingsman. Planted some old ones we chitted out from previous batches. Lots of growth and some incredible sizes.

Parsley – good supply from previous year’s sowing.

Chervil – ”

Chicory – ”

Strawberries – great year. Lots of lovely delicious red gems. Made lots of strawberry jam.

Raspberries – very good year. There were some to be picked in late November still. Lots of raspberry jam.

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Pears – didn’t get any because fox ate them all.

Grapes – only got one batch because birds ate them all.

Cherries – birds ate them all but the Morello was laden.

Damsons – good supply from one tree. Made one pot of damson jam which was delish.

Apples – very good harvest from all trees. First Bramley harvest, was yummy.

Quince – diseased so didn’t produce anything.

Mulberry – no produce.

Medlar – produced but did not develop and then eaten by birds.

Blueberries – good crop.

Redcurrants – very good crop.

Jostaberries – a lot stolen but birds but good crop.

Blackcurrants – ”

Gooseberries – no crop.

Chives – very good crop as always.

Parsnips – no actual parsnips but great flowers growing.

Plums – lots of Victorias and Green Gages. Made some good plum crumbles.

Sweet Potatoes – disaster. Didn’t cut off vines so no root growth.

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I think that is all…. thanks for the year 2018. It was busy, juggling with university, heatwaves, water leak fears, drought fears, and now freezing weather, but what a lovely time we had! Looking forward to another summer of playing in the sun in the garden.

Merry Christmas everyone from the Kitchen Garden in advance. And just to finish it off, what a good year for space2grow – one year ago it was established and it has so far one 3 Bloom awards, has been given sponsorship and its volunteers and supporters are rocketing, including santa…

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Red Cabbage

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Just look at that red cabbage… homegrown and harvested from the plot yesterday.

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It was the first time I have ever grown red cabbages before and I thought it was so beautiful, I decided to eat some. I went from cabbage hater, to ‘green cabbages are ok’ to ‘wow, red cabbages are good cooked too!’

Why should we eat cabbages?

89g of raw cabbage contains –

  • Protein: 1g
  • Fibre: 2g
  • Vitamin K: 85% of the RDI
  • Vitamin C: 54% of the RDI
  • Folate: 10% of the RDI
  • Manganese: 7% of the RDI
  • Vitamin B6: 6% of the RDI
  • Calcium: 4% of the RDI
  • Potassium: 4% of the RDI
  • Magnesium: 3% of the RDI

Vitamin B6 and folate are essential for many important processes in the body, including energy metabolism and the normal functioning of the nervous system. Cabbage is especially high in vitamin C, a potent antioxidant that may protect against heart disease, certain cancers and vision loss. While both green and red cabbage are excellent sources vic C, red cabbage contains about 30% more. One cup (89 grams) of chopped red cabbage packs in 85% of the recommended intake for vitamin C, which is the same amount found in a small orange. So I might avoid Fresher’s flu…

Cruciferous vegetables like cabbage contain many different antioxidants that have been shown to reduce chronic inflammation. Sulforaphane, kaempferol and other antioxidants found in brassicas are likely responsible for their anti-inflammatory effect.

Cabbage is full of gut friendly insoluble fibre, a type of carbohydrate that cannot be broken down in the intestines. Insoluble fiber helps keep the digestive system healthy by adding bulk to stools and promoting regular bowel movements. Cabbage is also rich in soluble fibre which has been shown to increase the number of beneficial bacteria in the gut. These bacteria perform important functions like protecting the immune system and producing critical nutrients like vitamins K2 and B12. Eating cabbage keeps your digestive system happy.

Red cabbage contains powerful compounds called anthocyanins. They give this vegetable its vibrant purple colour. Anthocyanins are plant pigments that belong to the flavonoid family. Many studies have found a link between eating foods rich in this pigment and a reduced risk of heart disease. Cabbage contains more than 36 different kinds of anthocyanins…

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How to eat it?

Raw is probably best as most of the nutrients will be withheld that can sometimes leave during the cooking process. But I find raw cabbage icky. Steamed is the next best, followed by boiled, roasted, fried.

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We boiled it and ate our red cabbage with lots of other homegrown produce for dinner – potatoes, sweetcorn, green Savoy cabbage, carrots, runner beans and courgette. It was beautiful and yummy and helped to ease my sore gut that had been suffering all day. See – homegrown produce is so good for you!

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Update: one more pumpkin left to harvest… the other plants have all turned brown and died from powdery mildew so I cut their fruits off and took them inside to cure (more information here for those who are interested: Curing pumpkins). I’m leaving the last one on to make sure it ripens more and will take it away when the plant finally has to go.

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Blight has hit the veg garden and the potatoes are starting to go – thank goodness it came so late this year as the main crop potatoes have managed to grow properly before the disease came. The tomatoes are going to suffer and I am expecting a lot of green ones to fall off soon but we did pretty well with the red tomatoes being grown outside this year in this once in a lifetime heatwave.

The autumn harvest of raspberries is being as wonderful as always. We had them last night for dessert along with homemade chocolate brownie ice cream and cookies and cream ice cream (recipes can be found on my Beagle Baking blog:

https://bellasbakingsite.wordpress.com/2018/08/06/chocolate-fudge-brownie-ice-cream/

https://bellasbakingsite.wordpress.com/2018/07/27/cookies-and-cream-ice-cream/  ).

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Extending the growing season – what to plant in autumn?

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Last night was probably the coldest nigh in the South East in months. The sun is now no longer reaching parts of the veg garden and it is dark sometime around 8pm. Now is the time to find something to grow in the last few months of 2018.

So what can you try growing as the weather cools down and the light fades?

  • Broad beans – Aguadulce or Superaguadulce– sow Oct-Feb, harvest Jun-Aug
  • Pea – Meteor – sow Oct-Nov, Jan-Mar, harvest May-Sep
  • Autumn planting onion sets – red Radar, brown Electric, white Snowball – sow Sept-Oct, harvest May-Jul
  • Garlic cloves – Provence Wight (Softneck), Lautrec Wight (Hardneck), Elephant Garlic – plant Sept-Oct, Jan-Mar, harvest Jun-Aug
  • Spinach – Turaco – sow Aug-Oct, harvest Jun-Oct
  • Cauliflower – All The Year Round – sow Sep-Oct, Jan-Jun, harvest Jun-Oct
  • Cabbages – Advantage – sow Mar-Oct, harvest Jan-Dec – Spring Hero – sow Sept, harvest Mar-May – Duncan – sow Sept-Oct, harvest Mar-Jun
  • Purple sprouting broccoli – Claret – plant Sept, harvest Mar-May
  • Winter lettuce – Density – sow Aug-April, harvest Mar-Jul – Valian – Sept-Mar, harvest Oct-May

Curing pumpkins

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Curing pumpkins involves hardening the skins to protect the flesh inside from deterioration. Do it properly and you can expect fruits to stay in top form for at least 3 months, comfortably taking you to the first harvests of next spring.

The fruit is harvested when it is uniformly orange and the rind is hard. Harvest the fruit by cutting it off the vine with a sharp knife or a pair of looping shears, leaving 3-6 inches of the stem attached to the fruit. This makes the fruit less likely to be attacked by fruit rot pathogens at the point of stem attachment.

Remove the fruits to a greenhouse or as sunny a windowsill as you can find, after  brushing off any dirt or washing in soap and warm water, drying first. Allow your fruits to sunbathe and develop a tan. This should take about two weeks for the top of the fruit then, once carefully flipped over, another two weeks for the bottom.

Pumpkins and winter squash prefer a well-ventilated, dry place. Keep the fruits raised up off hard surfaces on racks or wire mesh with a thick layer of newspaper or straw. Keeping them off the ground will allow air to circulate around the fruits while the extra padding will prevent the skin softening and becoming vulnerable to infection.

Once cured, store the pumpkins in cool, dry storage.

The pumpkins are coming…

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The pumpkins are turning orange – it must be autumn.

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We had a pretty good growth of pumpkins this year – at least one per plant. We’ve got about six in total off the top of my head.

I planted ‘Racer’ seeds indoors in tall yoghurt pots in April, I think… could have been May…

Anyway, they were planted outdoors into a very sunny patch during the heatwave. With regular feeds of rotted manure and blood fish and bone, they have flourished.

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We were really lucky that the heatwave kept back the powdery mildew this year (look at Powdery Mildew for more information and preventative treatment tips). This disease flourishes in warm but moist climates – so thank  you drought. It meant that the mildew that could attack as early as May or June stayed off until the last few days of August. Powdery mildew looks like this:

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To begin with, little spots of white mould form on the leaves. These quickly spread, covering the whole leaf and spreading to the stalks. The plant starts to turn brown. It shrivels and dies, sometimes taking the fruit with it. Very quickly you can end up with this:

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A dead plant.

I cut off two pumpkins yesterday from their dead plants to prevent the disease from spreading to the fruits themselves. Thank goodness they had already turned orange…

Next step is curing them…

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NEW SELF-HELP BOOK: Finding Rays of Sunshine

Newest (albeit lowest quality, most cheesy and random) self-help book is now available…

Have you ever felt down-in-the-dumps, stuck-in-a-rut, blue? We all have. Sometimes it is hard to shake it off. We are all looking for happiness but it is good to have a starting point. That is what this self-help book is. Listing ideas that could help you to feel light and enthusiastic about life, I am here to offer a helping hand to guide you behind those dark clouds while we look for rays of sunshine.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Finding-Rays-Sunshine-Hope-better/dp/1720356521/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1529131727&sr=8-5&keywords=isobel+murphy