Guest post: Underrated Activities That Promote Whole Health

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Underrated Activities That Promote Whole Health

By Brad Krause

Eat breakfast, don’t drink too much, smile and be happy — these are pretty basic aspects of a healthy lifestyle. But if this is all you are doing, you are seriously missing out. There are many ways to cater to your self-care needs. From the ancient practice of bath therapy to modern-day motivators, the following are a few of the most under-appreciated ways to live your best life.

 

Take a Warm Bath

The ancient Romans provided public bathhouses, and it wasn’t to ensure proper hygiene. Bathhouses were considered meeting places, but they also provided heat, warmth, and relaxation. Traditional Medicinals explains that bath therapy, also known as balneotherapy, is used to relax muscles and promote skin health. A warm bath in the afternoon is a great way to center your thoughts and settle in for another important aspect of self-care: sleep.

 

Go to Bed Early

Sleep is good for you for many reasons. It allows your body to recover from daily trauma and gives your mind an outlet to process the billions of bits of information that were thrown at you during the day. Make a conscious effort to get eight hours of sleep every night, and you will quickly realize that you have more energy, less stress, and feel better overall.

 

Exercise

 

It’s no secret that physical activity is crucial for your health. However, it is important to note that you don’t have to conform to a specific exercise program to reap the benefits. You also do not have to be 25 and in the best shape of your life to work out. In fact, seniors benefit just as much — and probably more so — than their recent-college-grad counterparts. No matter your age, you can get regular exercise by attending workout classes at a local facility, setting up a workout space at home, or simply doing things that would make you more active during the day like going for a walk or taking the stairs to work.

 

Track Your Activities

Exercising occasionally is not enough. One of the biggest benefits of working out is that it can help reduce the effects of stress. Keep yourself motivated to move by tracking your daily activities. For example, the Apple Watch Series 4 is great for seniors since it includes a built-in heart rate monitor. Of course, if you don’t want to spend several hundred dollars on a fitness tracker, Digital Trends lists several models that are less than $100, including the Withings Move, which looks more like a tradition analog timepiece.

 

Try Acupuncture

Acupuncture is not a new-age treatment. This ancient practice predates modern medicine by hundreds of years. A non-invasive healing treatment, acupuncture — especially when combined with Chinese medicine and herbs — can help you with issues such as constipation and bronchitis. Acupuncture also offers emotional relief for insomnia, stress, and depression. Visit a local acupuncturist for your personalized therapy.

 

Eat for Gut Health

You may be surprised to know that your gut plays a vital role in your overall health, from weight management to your mood levels. That’s because the gut contains many different strains of bacteria, each responsible for specific bodily functions. For example, Bifidobacterium helps to keep your intestines healthy and produces essential vitamins like B12. Meanwhile, L. helveticus and B. longum both act as mood boosters. Keeping a well-balanced environment in your gut will help these bacteria thrive and improve your health. The key is to eat the right foods for your gut and take supplements that promote gut health.

 

Drink More Water

How much water do you drink every day? If you’re like most people, probably nowhere near enough. This is unfortunate because adding a few extra glasses of H2O to your day flushes your kidneys, normalizes bowel function, and can even reduce the risk of cancer. You can add fresh fruit to your glass for a refreshing drink that’s full of flavor if you don’t like plain water.

 

Everything you do has an effect on your health. From sneaking a 30-minute warm bath to lying down on the acupuncture table, the above ideas are simple, inexpensive, and effective ways to give yourself a boost from the inside out. Try a few or try them all. You won’t regret your decision, and you’ll feel much better for it.

 

Image via Pexels

Pumpkin, Cheese and Garlic Bake [Vegetarian Christmas dish]

Christmas dinner can be a little tricky if you are vegetarian. Sure, you’ve got all the veg, bread sauce, Yorkshire puds and vegetarian stuffing if you like it, but unless you are splashing out on a nut roast, there isn’t a lot to make up a ‘main meal’. As a vegetarian – not just a vegetarian, but a fussy vegetarian who needs a balanced meal with all the groups for health reasons – Christmas dinner can be a pain when it comes to protein. I don’t like bread sauce, Yorkshire puds, stuffing or nut roast, so I’m basically doomed. This year, as I was catering for two vegetarians, I thought it was time to try a new recipe. I still had three pumpkins from the veg patch and I thought it was perfect for xmas dinner – I know they are traditionally linked with Thanksgiving, but in the UK we didn’t have it a month earlier so we could afford to use the pumpkin again!

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I needed something quick and simple, with some protein in. I opted for cheese. As pumpkin is, well, bland, I also decided to throw some garlic in there too.

It is really basic and can be made in advance of the big day so it doesn’t take up space in the kitchen. Of course, you could make this any time of the year too 😉

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Pumpkin, Cheese and Garlic Bake

(Serves 6)

-1 large pumpkin -Olive oil, for drizzling -260g cheddar cheese -20g Swiss gruye -2 garlic cloves

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C.
  2. Cut the pumpkin and remove the seeds. Cut the pumpkin into large slices and place on baking trays. Drizzle with olive oil and roast in the oven for about 45 minutes, or until golden and cooked. Allow to cool completely.
  3. Cut the pumpkin up into small cubes and place in an oven-proof dish.
  4. Grate the cheese and dice the garlic up into small pieces. Mix together and then sprinkle it over the top of the pumpkin.
  5. Preheat the grill to high and heat the bake until the cheese has melted at the top is golden – it should only take a minute or two so keep an eye on it. Or, preheat the oven to 200C and bake for approximately 10-20 minutes, or until the top is golden and the cheese has melted.
  6. Serve. Store in the fridge when cold.

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Christmas from the garden

Christmas is one of the busiest times in the kitchen, but it doesn’t mean you can’t pop out to the garden too… especially to harvest things.

Christmas cooking can be like the climax of the harvested year. You can give your jams away as presents, eat redcurrant and cranberry jelly and sauce with your Christmas meal. Harvested chestnuts or other nuts can be used in desserts. Dried cranberries or raisins are great for puds. And of course, anything that is still green at this time of year can be added to your wreath or house for festive cheer.

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Dried Cranberry Chocolate Cake anyone?

But you don’t have to stop there… what about the main Christmas meal?

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What about growing and cooking your own Christmas dinner?

For future thinking, here are some traditional Christmas dinner things you could plan to grow for next Christmas:

  • Potatoes – we always plant so many we still have plenty in the ground come Christmas day. As long as they are well buried and not planted in too damp a place, potato tubers will be fine against the frosts.
  • Brussel Sprouts or Brukale (Brussel sprout crossed with kale).
  • Kale
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots – yes, you can still be harvesting carrots from the ground at Christmas, if you cover them with fleece.
  • Parsnips
  • Cabbages
  • Beetroot – why not add some to your roasted roots?
  • Celeriac – ditto, or a celeriac mash? Or just boiled?
  • Celery – homemade stuffing anyone? And in that case how about freezing some pears or storing some apple too?
  • Onions
  • Runner- beans or peas – store them in your freezers all year round from the first harvest onwards.
  • Pumpkin or squash – usually USA’s Thanksgiving, I know, but how about roasting some and creating a vegetarian/vegan replacement for the usual meat?
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Homegrown Brussels and Brukale

Christmas is a holiday, a time of celebration and of having fun with loved ones. To me, it is also a time to be creative and original, to do what I love by going back and cooking from scratch, a way of tying up my year of cooking and growing. This year we will be having our own cabbage, beans, pumpkin, celeriac, beetroot, carrots, potatoes and Brussel Sprouts, not to forget homegrown redcurrant jelly and homemade cranberry sauce… What a way to celebrate an end to 2018!

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RIP David Austin Sr. 

What do you grow/dream of growing for Christmas time? Let us know.

For Christmas baking recipes, check out Beagle Baking (https://bellasbakingsite.wordpress.com/home/)

Just type ‘Christmas’ into the search bar and it will show you some festive treats.

And then, after all that food, just follow Rainbow’s advice:

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Bed.

Summery of 2018 in the Veg Garden

It is time to do the annual check list of how this year when in the vegetable garden.

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It was an unusually cold, uneventful spring this year – we basically skipped it and went straight from winter to summer. But boy, what a summer it was! Major heatwave and no rain for weeks on end. It was glorious, even if it did mean a lot of watering all day long…

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But how did this all impact on the plants?

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Lettuce – started off really good but struggled with the hot weather in the heatwave and bolted. We bought loose leaf lettuce plants from Sainsbury’s and planted them out and they did pretty well despite the weather. When they bolted, the ducks and chickens loved them.

Spinach – bad year for spinach, not a lot germinating, probably because my seeds were too old. I bought some new ones at the end of the season and got a few to grow, but it was too late by then. Oh well, next year!

Rocket – very good rocket growth this year. Planted some at the beginning of the season and at the end and both batches lasted ages – the last batch has only just gone thanks to Jack Frost.

Radishes – they love sun and were whopping sizes.

Carrots – started off very badly. I sowed them in early March and they did not germinate at all. Sowed some in June/July, thinking it wouldn’t work, and we got a beautiful crop. Some really big ones too!

Celery – I wasn’t going to grow celery this year but a neighbour gave us some spare plug-plants so I used them. They grew pretty well, but were not very tasty. I think they needed more watering a care.

Celeriac – again, wasn’t planning on growing more, but were given plug plants. They seem to be surviving, along with last years crop I never got out of the ground… at least the pigs will be happy…

Cauliflower – didn’t come to anything, as usual!

Peas – had some really good crops but the pea plants themselves died off really quickly. I think it was too dry and they needed more care and watering. Mixed bag with the germination rates.

Beetroot – did fantastically well. I only planted one batch and we still have three buried in the ground to get through. Bolthardy is amazing.

Cabbages – I was too late to sow brassicas so we bought some plug plants from the garden centre. The savoys and spring cabbages did not do very well and ended up going to the poultry, but the red cabbages… I am now converted. Beautiful, huge, delicious and a few more left to get through…

Brussel Sprouts – ran out of time to sow seeds but were given plug plants. They are huge and delicious. Producing really well despite my lack of feeding and weeding this year.

Sweetcorn -OMG. Best sweetcorn harvest ever. So big, yellow and yum. Really big cobs! So exciting.

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Pumpkins – amazing crop, some big and small ones, each plant produced lots.

Courgettes – really good. Mixture of types of courgettes grown this year, including Defender, Golden Zucchini, Grisdella etc. All produced lots, really yummy. Cucurbits do love sun.

Cucumbers – didn’t do great, but did fine. Needed more watering and care. Only got a few Passandras and Femspot varieties, I think.

Tomatoes: did pretty well, but again needed more care. Got a few outdoors and indoors this year thanks to the sunshine.

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Broccoli – ran out of time to sow so bought plug plants. Did pretty well – lots of small florets rather than big ones. Probably more water needed?

Aubergines – plug plant bought as my seeds did not germinate. I think harvested one? A few grew but did not develop into edible stage.

Sweet Pepper – plug plant as seeds did not germinate. Got quite a few small but delicious ones.

Runner-beans – very good harvest. So many grew after my fears none would germinate due to the hot weather. Roots left in ground from previous years grew again. Got an amazing supply and was still harvesting in November!

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Chickpeas – only one plant survived out of the billions of seeds planted. Didn’t develop anything. Will have to try again another year.

Onions – did not do great. Not very big. Needed more water probably.

Garlic – as good as always!

Potatoes – amazing as always! Bought some early Charlottes and Red Duke of York and a main crop Kingsman. Planted some old ones we chitted out from previous batches. Lots of growth and some incredible sizes.

Parsley – good supply from previous year’s sowing.

Chervil – ”

Chicory – ”

Strawberries – great year. Lots of lovely delicious red gems. Made lots of strawberry jam.

Raspberries – very good year. There were some to be picked in late November still. Lots of raspberry jam.

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Pears – didn’t get any because fox ate them all.

Grapes – only got one batch because birds ate them all.

Cherries – birds ate them all but the Morello was laden.

Damsons – good supply from one tree. Made one pot of damson jam which was delish.

Apples – very good harvest from all trees. First Bramley harvest, was yummy.

Quince – diseased so didn’t produce anything.

Mulberry – no produce.

Medlar – produced but did not develop and then eaten by birds.

Blueberries – good crop.

Redcurrants – very good crop.

Jostaberries – a lot stolen but birds but good crop.

Blackcurrants – ”

Gooseberries – no crop.

Chives – very good crop as always.

Parsnips – no actual parsnips but great flowers growing.

Plums – lots of Victorias and Green Gages. Made some good plum crumbles.

Sweet Potatoes – disaster. Didn’t cut off vines so no root growth.

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I think that is all…. thanks for the year 2018. It was busy, juggling with university, heatwaves, water leak fears, drought fears, and now freezing weather, but what a lovely time we had! Looking forward to another summer of playing in the sun in the garden.

Merry Christmas everyone from the Kitchen Garden in advance. And just to finish it off, what a good year for space2grow – one year ago it was established and it has so far one 3 Bloom awards, has been given sponsorship and its volunteers and supporters are rocketing, including santa…

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Pumpkin Risotto

We still have a few pumpkins waiting for attention. Roasting them and then adding to a dish is a perfect way of using them – see Pumpkin Coconut CurryPumpkin SoupPumpkin cake for more ideas…

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Pumpkin Risotto

(Serves 4)

-1 small pumpkin -Olive oil, for  roasting -25g butter – 1 onion, sliced – 325g rice – Salt and pepper, for seasoning -750ml vegetable stock –More cooked vegetables, to serve (optional)

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 180C. Slice and clear the insides of a pumpkin. Cut into segments and place on a roasting tray, drizzled with olive oil. Roast for 45 minutes, or until golden brown.
  2. Melt the butter in a large frying pan. Add the onion and fry gently over a medium heat for 2-3 minutes. Turn the heat down a little.
  3. Add the rice and a grinding of salt and pepper. Stir to coat the rice with the butter.
  4. Add the stock after frying the rice like a pilau for a couple of minutes, bring to the boil, stirring frequently.
  5. Turn the heat down once the stock is bubbling and leave to simmer until almost all of the stock has been absorbed. Add the roasted pumpkin, cut up into squares, cover, and leave to simmer for 5-10 minutes.
  6. Serve with cooked vegetables.

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Cranberry lovers?

Any dried cranberry lovers out there?

Two treats here, one from Nigella’s Cookalong competition. Both chocolate cake…

Follow the links below!

https://bellasbakingsite.wordpress.com/2017/12/19/christmas-cupcakes-nigellas/

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Nigella’s Chocolate Christmas Cupcakes

https://bellasbakingsite.wordpress.com/2016/12/10/christmas-brownie-and-walnut-cake/

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Chocolate Brownie and Walnut Cake with Dried Cranberries

Homemade Christmas Sauces

I’m currently making redcurrant jelly and cranberry sauce (at least it has made room in the freezer for the other’s turkey).

We always put out redcurrant jelly and cranberry sauce for christmas lunch as one of the christmas sauces to have along with the main meal.

For the last couple of years, I’ve also been making redcurrant jelly along with raspberry jam for presents, especially to my cousin who has been very receptive and lovely about my homemade concoctions – brave soul!

Do you fancy making your own sides for christmas dinner? They are very easy and the recipes are right here, specially for you!

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Redcurrant Jelly

(Makes 4-5x 225g jars)

– 1kg redcurrants – 400ml water – Granulated sugar (see method for further instructions about amounts needed)

  1. Put the redcurrants in a large pan with 400ml of water. Simmer until soft and the juices from the currants have leaked. It should take about 45 minutes.
  2. Strain through a jelly bag/muslin for several hours, better yet to leave it overnight, taking care not to poke or prod as this will result in a cloudy jam.

3. Measure the juice and put it into a clean pan. For every 600ml of juice, add 450g of sugar as you start to bring the pan of liquid to the boil, stirring the sugar in until it has dissolved. Bring it to a rapid boil and leave it for about 8 minutes, stirring occasionally to check if the liquid is becoming sticky rather than runny.

4. Pectin test: Put a china plate inside the freezer until it is cold. Put a small dollop of jelly on the plate and put it back in the freezer for a minute. Remove and run your finger through the middle – if it leaves a trail, it is done. If it starts to run back together, continue to boil and keep checking regularly – be careful not to leave it for too long or it will burn but under-boil it and it will not set.

5. Once your jelly has started to set, remove from the heat and allow to cool before ladling the liquid into sterilised jam jars.

6. To sterilise jam jars, place the jars and lids inside an oven preheated to 150C until warm to the touch. Remove from oven and leave to cool completely before using.

7. Place a wax disc over the top of the jelly in the jars to help them keep longer, seal the lid and label. Store in a cool, dry, dark place overnight before using to allow it to set properly. Serve with your Sunday roast dinner. Use within 12 months.

Here is the link for more redcurrant recipes and fun facts about the fruit: https://thekitchengardenblog.wordpress.com/2016/08/22/redcurrants/

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Dad’s Cranberry Sauce

(Makes 4x 350g jars)

-900g fresh/frozen cranberries -Juice of 2 oranges -150g granulated sugar

  1. Place the cranberries in a large pan.
  2. Add the juice of the oranges to the pan followed by the sugar.
  3. Bring everything up to simmering point, stir well, put a lid on the pan and let it all simmer for about 20 minutes, or until the cranberries are breaking down. Stir now and then.
  4. Remove the pan from the heat. When it is cool enough to handle, scrape into sterilised jam jars. Store in the fridge. For freezing, when cool transfer the relish to a plastic container and freeze.

Here is the link for more cranberry recipes and fun facts about the fruit: 

https://thekitchengardenblog.wordpress.com/2016/12/24/cranberries/