Roses

My mama just surprised me with (very) early birthday presents … so she didn’t have to look after them until then!

She bought me three David Austen roses.

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‘Gentle Hermione’

I love roses, they are my favourite flower. Now, my mum makes a point about not buying plants for their names (I try not to, but I am a bit of a sucker for a good name on a label), but this time she completely changed her tune. She bought me a light pink, gorgeous smelling one with little petals called ‘Desdemona’. This is the name of one of our pet ducks. Then I unwrapped another one called ‘Gentle Hermione’, another light pink one with larger flowers. This is the name of our other pet duck. I opened the third one, unsure what to find (as we had run out of duck names by this point) and was amazed to read a label saying ‘Tess of the D’Urbervilles’. Whoever named this rose as dark red as strawberries that, is a hero.

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(Little explanation: ‘Tess of the D’Urbervilles’ is one of Thomas Hardy’s most brilliant novels that I recently re-read for my English literature Victorian course a few months ago and loved it just as much as the first time I read it. Honestly, it is probably one of the causes for my obsession with cows, farming and the Dorset countryside… But back to Tess: she is a tragic heroine who is disgraced in the eyes of society and therefore unable to find peace and happiness. It is a beautiful book and one I highly recommend for anyone who likes Victorian fiction. And yes, the strawberries and colour red is one of those big symbols that pop up throughout the narrative. Red=blood=loss of purity/murder etc…).

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‘Desdemona’
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‘Gentle Hermione’
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‘Tess of the D’Urbervilles’

We also got given a big (I mean BIG) pile of strawberry plants from our neighbour in return for looking after her veggie garden for a week in this massive heatwave going on. So, planting it is…

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‘Desdemona’ 

 

Homemade Christmas Sauces

I’m currently making redcurrant jelly and cranberry sauce (at least it has made room in the freezer for the other’s turkey).

We always put out redcurrant jelly and cranberry sauce for christmas lunch as one of the christmas sauces to have along with the main meal.

For the last couple of years, I’ve also been making redcurrant jelly along with raspberry jam for presents, especially to my cousin who has been very receptive and lovely about my homemade concoctions – brave soul!

Do you fancy making your own sides for christmas dinner? They are very easy and the recipes are right here, specially for you!

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Redcurrant Jelly

(Makes 4-5x 225g jars)

– 1kg redcurrants – 400ml water – Granulated sugar (see method for further instructions about amounts needed)

  1. Put the redcurrants in a large pan with 400ml of water. Simmer until soft and the juices from the currants have leaked. It should take about 45 minutes.
  2. Strain through a jelly bag/muslin for several hours, better yet to leave it overnight, taking care not to poke or prod as this will result in a cloudy jam.

3. Measure the juice and put it into a clean pan. For every 600ml of juice, add 450g of sugar as you start to bring the pan of liquid to the boil, stirring the sugar in until it has dissolved. Bring it to a rapid boil and leave it for about 8 minutes, stirring occasionally to check if the liquid is becoming sticky rather than runny.

4. Pectin test: Put a china plate inside the freezer until it is cold. Put a small dollop of jelly on the plate and put it back in the freezer for a minute. Remove and run your finger through the middle – if it leaves a trail, it is done. If it starts to run back together, continue to boil and keep checking regularly – be careful not to leave it for too long or it will burn but under-boil it and it will not set.

5. Once your jelly has started to set, remove from the heat and allow to cool before ladling the liquid into sterilised jam jars.

6. To sterilise jam jars, place the jars and lids inside an oven preheated to 150C until warm to the touch. Remove from oven and leave to cool completely before using.

7. Place a wax disc over the top of the jelly in the jars to help them keep longer, seal the lid and label. Store in a cool, dry, dark place overnight before using to allow it to set properly. Serve with your Sunday roast dinner. Use within 12 months.

Here is the link for more redcurrant recipes and fun facts about the fruit: https://thekitchengardenblog.wordpress.com/2016/08/22/redcurrants/

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Dad’s Cranberry Sauce

(Makes 4x 350g jars)

-900g fresh/frozen cranberries -Juice of 2 oranges -150g granulated sugar

  1. Place the cranberries in a large pan.
  2. Add the juice of the oranges to the pan followed by the sugar.
  3. Bring everything up to simmering point, stir well, put a lid on the pan and let it all simmer for about 20 minutes, or until the cranberries are breaking down. Stir now and then.
  4. Remove the pan from the heat. When it is cool enough to handle, scrape into sterilised jam jars. Store in the fridge. For freezing, when cool transfer the relish to a plastic container and freeze.

Here is the link for more cranberry recipes and fun facts about the fruit: 

https://thekitchengardenblog.wordpress.com/2016/12/24/cranberries/

 

 

Christmas time = cooking time

Well, it is December and the festivities are drawing closer.

I end my uni term this Friday (finally) and at space 2 grow we have our last meeting on Wednesday to clear space for the vegetable patch!!!! before breaking up until the new year. We have a special Christmas dinner on Thursday night to celebrate all of the work that we have done so far. I thought I was going to have to make nut roast for it (ah) but it turns out I don’t need to (phew) so instead I am making some brownies tomorrow night to bring along to our Wednesday meeting to encourage everyone to keep digging, pruning and burning (we have a couple of pyromaniacs on board).

But back to Christmas – this is a time for not so much growing in the garden, but they are very special because of this. Brussel Sprouts, Celeriac, Celery, Kale, Cabbage, Carrots. All of those cosy winter veggies. And Cranberries.

You’ve planted all of your delights in the warm weather, now it is time to play with the harvest indoors when it is hitting minus temperatures outside. So here are some little festive treats to get you in the mood. Some are from this blog, some are from my other blog Bella’s Baking, now very recently Beagle Baking. If any of you have a beagle, you will understand.

Brussels Sprouts – ideas and information about your favourite green!

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Cranberries – cranberry sauce is essential for Christmas lunch, as is this Christmas Chocolate Walnut and dried Cranberry cake!

Chestnuts – chestnut jam anyone?

Gingerbread Men — Bella’s Baking – link to Bella’s Baking/ Beagle Baking blog with plenty of baking recipes for the festivities, plus more coming…

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Christmas Cake: https://bellasbakingsite.wordpress.com/2017/11/05/iced-and-marzipan-christmas-cake/

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Christmas Pudding: https://bellasbakingsite.wordpress.com/2017/11/04/christmas-pudding/

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Brownies make great presents: https://bellasbakingsite.wordpress.com/2017/01/07/brownies/

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Christmas Buns: So good: https://bellasbakingsite.wordpress.com/2016/12/24/christmas-buns/

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Chocolate Log: https://bellasbakingsite.wordpress.com/2016/12/19/chocolate-log/

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TO COME: Californian Christmas Cake, Mice Pies, Homemade Mincemeat, Homemade Redcurrant Jelly, Brussel Sprouts Cranberry and Potato Bake, Vegetarian Stuffing…