Harvesting in January

So I have a confession…

I have not worked in the vegetable garden at all this Christmas break.

I know, very bad. But I was juggling work, university work and working in the pig run to prevent it from resembling the battle of the Somme over winter. Those are my only excuses.

Despite my lack of care, the garden has looked after itself pretty well (the grass is thriving in all of the beds it should not be in…)

It has been so long since I worked over there regularly that I had actually forgotten what I still had planted and left to harvest. I had forgotten the kale, the rest of the sprouts and carrots, the tree cabbage… all I thought we had left were potatoes. So I made a big effort and harvested and prepared lots of our produce during the week.

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Carrots: these are the last of the carrots sown this year. They were under horticultural fleece and managed to survive some of the freezing temperatures we had suddenly. Not one has rotted so thank goodness we are on sandy soil. They were delicious and not a lot of damage or forking going on. We even had one gorgeous proper sized carrot!

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Think they are ‘Flyaway’ carrots.

Celeriac: first homegrown celeriac harvested from this crop. I know, lazy. But it was in really good condition, a good size, and tasted really good. I like to boil mine but roasting them makes an excellent replacement/accompaniment to roasted parsnips as they apparently taste the same. I have also eaten it raw, grated with apple, in a salad and that is surprisingly good too.

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Brussel Sprouts – the left over small ones from Christmas finished up. They did really well and packed a punch to the taste-buds.

Kale – the kale is still alive and doing pretty well despite the various slug/pigeon/ cabbage white attacks it had this year. I do love kale boiled and it goes great in stews, on top of pizzas, in casseroles or stir fries. Kale is brilliant because it fills in the cold ‘hungry gap’ aka, winter, when most other things aren’t available.

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Garlic – I sneak up a bulb every time I need it. Garlic is still prolific in our garden from years of growing it.

Potatoes – Too. Many. Luckily, they taste really good and are in pretty good condition.

All of this dinner was homegrown, except the lentils. Self-sufficient and proud of my little garden for doing so well all on its own.

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Pumpkin, Cheese and Garlic Bake [Vegetarian Christmas dish]

Christmas dinner can be a little tricky if you are vegetarian. Sure, you’ve got all the veg, bread sauce, Yorkshire puds and vegetarian stuffing if you like it, but unless you are splashing out on a nut roast, there isn’t a lot to make up a ‘main meal’. As a vegetarian – not just a vegetarian, but a fussy vegetarian who needs a balanced meal with all the groups for health reasons – Christmas dinner can be a pain when it comes to protein. I don’t like bread sauce, Yorkshire puds, stuffing or nut roast, so I’m basically doomed. This year, as I was catering for two vegetarians, I thought it was time to try a new recipe. I still had three pumpkins from the veg patch and I thought it was perfect for xmas dinner – I know they are traditionally linked with Thanksgiving, but in the UK we didn’t have it a month earlier so we could afford to use the pumpkin again!

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I needed something quick and simple, with some protein in. I opted for cheese. As pumpkin is, well, bland, I also decided to throw some garlic in there too.

It is really basic and can be made in advance of the big day so it doesn’t take up space in the kitchen. Of course, you could make this any time of the year too ūüėČ

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Pumpkin, Cheese and Garlic Bake

(Serves 6)

-1 large pumpkin -Olive oil, for drizzling -260g cheddar cheese -20g Swiss gruye -2 garlic cloves

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C.
  2. Cut the pumpkin and remove the seeds. Cut the pumpkin into large slices and place on baking trays. Drizzle with olive oil and roast in the oven for about 45 minutes, or until golden and cooked. Allow to cool completely.
  3. Cut the pumpkin up into small cubes and place in an oven-proof dish.
  4. Grate the cheese and dice the garlic up into small pieces. Mix together and then sprinkle it over the top of the pumpkin.
  5. Preheat the grill to high and heat the bake until the cheese has melted at the top is golden – it should only take a minute or two so keep an eye on it. Or, preheat the oven to 200C and bake for approximately 10-20 minutes, or until the top is golden and the cheese has melted.
  6. Serve. Store in the fridge when cold.

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Pumpkin Risotto

We still have a few pumpkins waiting for attention. Roasting them and then adding to a dish is a perfect way of using them – see¬†Pumpkin Coconut Curry,¬†Pumpkin Soup,¬†Pumpkin cake¬†for more ideas…

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Pumpkin Risotto

(Serves 4)

-1 small pumpkin -Olive oil, for ¬†roasting -25g butter ‚Äď 1 onion, sliced ‚Äď 325g rice ‚Äď Salt and pepper, for seasoning -750ml vegetable stock ‚ÄďMore cooked vegetables, to serve (optional)

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 180C. Slice and clear the insides of a pumpkin. Cut into segments and place on a roasting tray, drizzled with olive oil. Roast for 45 minutes, or until golden brown.
  2. Melt the butter in a large frying pan. Add the onion and fry gently over a medium heat for 2-3 minutes. Turn the heat down a little.
  3. Add the rice and a grinding of salt and pepper. Stir to coat the rice with the butter.
  4. Add the stock after frying the rice like a pilau for a couple of minutes, bring to the boil, stirring frequently.
  5. Turn the heat down once the stock is bubbling and leave to simmer until almost all of the stock has been absorbed. Add the roasted pumpkin, cut up into squares, cover, and leave to simmer for 5-10 minutes.
  6. Serve with cooked vegetables.

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Recipe: Kidney beans and fried onion

Such an easy, simple dish but tastes so good. 

Homegrown potato, runner beans and onion, fried with kidney beans in olive oil, and mashed with butter

Kidney Beans and Fried Onion

(Serves 4)

-Dash of olive oil, for frying -450g kidney beans (drained if canned, soaked and cooked if dried) -1 large onion, sliced 

  1. Warm the olive oil in a frying pan. Add the onion and fry until just starting to turn golden.
  2. Add the kidney beans and turn the heat down to medium and heat for a couple of minutes. 
  3. Remove from the heat and serve with a baked potato mashed with butter, a side salad or some veggies. 

Pumpkin Soup

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I haven’t made a lot of soups in my time – carrot and coriander once years ago and a vegetable broth at River Cottage – but I have always wanted to make pumpkin soup with a homegrown pumpkin.

We did really well with the pumpkins this year and after my siblings had carved their spooky faces into two of them for Halloween, I turned one of them – forgotten which one, might have been Bob or Reg… – into soup. Cruel, but it was either that or feed him to the pigs.

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Here is my super-duper easy pumpkin soup. You could add more seasoning to it of you would like more flavour. I have heard suggestions of chilli and peanut butter before…

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Pumpkin Soup

Serves… a lot. At least ten people.¬†

-1 medium sized pumpkin, 1.5kg, de-seeded -Olive oil, for roasting and frying -1 large onion, sliced -700ml boiling water -1 generous tsp Bouillon vegetable stock powder – A pinch of salt

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C. Cut the pumpkin up into chunks and place on a non-stick baking tray. Drizzle generously with olive oil and place in the centre of the oven. Roast for about 45 minutes, or until the pumpkin wedges are cooked and perhaps browning a little. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.
  2. In a deep-based pan, fry the onion in olive oil until golden brown.
  3. Place the pumpkin and the onion in a food processor and blitz until mush.
  4. Add the tsp veg stock powder to the boiling water and mix well. Slowly pour into the food processor and blitz the pumpkin again.
  5. Scare the contents of the food processor into the pan and bring to the boil, stirring. Add the pinch of salt.
  6. Serve hot in bowls. Store in the fridge for up to 3 days. Can be frozen too.

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Red Cabbage

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Just look at that red cabbage… homegrown and harvested from the plot yesterday.

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It was the first time I have ever grown red cabbages before and I thought it was so beautiful, I decided to eat some. I went from cabbage hater, to ‘green cabbages are ok’ to ‘wow, red cabbages are good cooked too!’

Why should we eat cabbages?

89g of raw cabbage contains –

  • Protein: 1g
  • Fibre:¬†2g
  • Vitamin K:¬†85% of the RDI
  • Vitamin C:¬†54% of the RDI
  • Folate:¬†10% of the RDI
  • Manganese:¬†7% of the RDI
  • Vitamin B6:¬†6% of the RDI
  • Calcium:¬†4% of the RDI
  • Potassium:¬†4% of the RDI
  • Magnesium:¬†3% of the RDI

Vitamin B6 and folate are essential for many important processes in the body, including energy metabolism and the normal functioning of the nervous system.¬†Cabbage is especially high in vitamin C, a potent antioxidant that may protect against heart disease, certain cancers and vision loss.¬†While both green and red cabbage are excellent sources vic C, red cabbage contains about 30% more.¬†One cup (89 grams) of chopped red cabbage packs in 85% of the recommended intake for vitamin C, which is the same amount found in a small orange. So I might avoid Fresher’s flu…

Cruciferous vegetables like cabbage contain many different antioxidants that have been shown to reduce chronic inflammation. Sulforaphane, kaempferol and other antioxidants found in brassicas are likely responsible for their anti-inflammatory effect.

Cabbage is full of gut friendly insoluble fibre, a type of carbohydrate that cannot be broken down in the intestines. Insoluble fiber helps keep the digestive system healthy by adding bulk to stools and promoting regular bowel movements. Cabbage is also rich in soluble fibre which has been shown to increase the number of beneficial bacteria in the gut. These bacteria perform important functions like protecting the immune system and producing critical nutrients like vitamins K2 and B12. Eating cabbage keeps your digestive system happy.

Red cabbage contains powerful compounds called anthocyanins. They give this vegetable its vibrant purple colour.¬†Anthocyanins are plant pigments that belong to the flavonoid family.¬†Many studies have found a link between eating foods rich in this pigment and a reduced risk of heart disease.¬†Cabbage contains more than 36 different kinds of anthocyanins…

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How to eat it?

Raw is probably best as most of the nutrients will be withheld that can sometimes leave during the cooking process. But I find raw cabbage icky. Steamed is the next best, followed by boiled, roasted, fried.

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We boiled it and ate our red cabbage with lots of other homegrown produce for dinner – potatoes, sweetcorn, green Savoy cabbage, carrots, runner beans and courgette. It was beautiful and yummy and helped to ease my sore gut that had been suffering all day. See – homegrown produce is so good for you!

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Update: one more pumpkin left to harvest… the other plants have all turned brown and died from powdery mildew so I cut their fruits off and took them inside to cure (more information here for those who are interested:¬†Curing pumpkins). I’m leaving the last one on to make sure it ripens more and will take it away when the plant finally has to go.

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Blight has hit the veg garden and the potatoes are starting to go – thank goodness it came so late this year as the main crop potatoes have managed to grow properly before the disease came. The tomatoes are going to suffer and I am expecting a lot of green ones to fall off soon but we did pretty well with the red tomatoes being grown outside this year in this once in a lifetime heatwave.

The autumn harvest of raspberries is being as wonderful as always. We had them last night for dessert along with homemade chocolate brownie ice cream and cookies and cream ice cream (recipes can be found on my Beagle Baking blog:

https://bellasbakingsite.wordpress.com/2018/08/06/chocolate-fudge-brownie-ice-cream/

https://bellasbakingsite.wordpress.com/2018/07/27/cookies-and-cream-ice-cream/  ).

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Extending the growing season – what to plant in autumn?

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Last night was probably the coldest nigh in the South East in months. The sun is now no longer reaching parts of the veg garden and it is dark sometime around 8pm. Now is the time to find something to grow in the last few months of 2018.

So what can you try growing as the weather cools down and the light fades?

  • Broad beans – Aguadulce¬†or Superaguadulce– sow Oct-Feb, harvest Jun-Aug
  • Pea – Meteor – sow Oct-Nov, Jan-Mar, harvest May-Sep
  • Autumn planting onion sets –¬†red¬†Radar, brown¬†Electric, white¬†Snowball¬†– sow Sept-Oct, harvest May-Jul
  • Garlic cloves –¬†Provence Wight¬†(Softneck),¬†Lautrec Wight¬†(Hardneck),¬†Elephant Garlic – plant Sept-Oct, Jan-Mar, harvest Jun-Aug
  • Spinach – Turaco – sow Aug-Oct, harvest Jun-Oct
  • Cauliflower – All The Year Round – sow Sep-Oct, Jan-Jun, harvest Jun-Oct
  • Cabbages – Advantage – sow Mar-Oct, harvest Jan-Dec – Spring Hero – sow Sept, harvest Mar-May – Duncan – sow Sept-Oct, harvest Mar-Jun
  • Purple sprouting broccoli – Claret – plant Sept, harvest Mar-May
  • Winter lettuce – Density – sow Aug-April, harvest Mar-Jul –¬†Valian¬†– Sept-Mar, harvest Oct-May